Thursday, November 16, 2006

PATRICIA ISASA

“You are murdered. Nobody know where you are. You don't know where you are. And we are God.”

"Disappeared" from her Argentine class room in 1976 at the age of 16,

Tortured in the Santa Fe police station for two and a half years

By men risen to high position when she tracked them down

Over the years since her release.

She put nine in prison to await a trial they never gave her

While she joins a protest at The School of the Americas

This weekend in Fort Benning, Georgia

United States of Amarica

Where they were trained


And finally, when I release, I remember the nature.

_________

Watch this indominable spirit of liberty tell of her rise above the degradation of her captors in an interview on Democracy Now. Compared to her, everyone else in the human rights movement seem to be slackers.

8 comments:

Pocho said...

There was a brief article linked here a few days ago in Non Aligned Nation News that detailed arrest of 261 persons considered responsible for the Argentinian repressions of the late 70's. We were discussing this in the Further Left Chat Room with Further Left Forum< team member and Argentine activist Miguel, whose life was very much altered by those. His comment was "... finally. after many years of struggle. I dont trust the court but at least its something."

gregrandgar said...

Hi Pocho,
I still cannot get into the chat room with my mac. Not the blue screen or anything else shows up after the java splash page finishes, ah well.

I was shaken to my core by this interview with Patricia at the moment when she said the line I quoted under the bottom picture, as her animated face reexperienced the feeling of seeing trees after two and a half years of a "small, small place." She has once again radicalized my all too passive attitude toward the effectiveness of politics to do more than wage logical warfare over how to achieve peace and justice. She is one person with a passion perhaps impossible without the horror of her past, but somewhere she connected to me like no other call to action I have ever witnessed. I hope you saw it and that everyone could view it for just such inspiration.

mullet said...

ugly place, this

troutsky said...

I had the honor of meeting Father Roy Bourgeoise who organized the School of the Americas watch many years ago and has guided it into one of the most visible yearly acts of dissent in this country.I was inspired by his level of dedication and think efforts like this help to expose the hypocricy of so much US foreign policy.The lack of serious mainstream news coverage also exposes their role in supporting policy.People will be crossing that line and doing serious jail time for their moral convictions. I am undecided about the real effectiveness of getting locked up, you?

gregrandgar said...

Civil disobedience to an unjust society is always the most moral way to go, but it certainly is more effective in ending what it protests by ensuring that everyone knows it is going on and can witness the treatment of passive dissent. I know of no better, more radicalizing wake up call for the sleepy sheeple than seeing their neighbors bullied, arrested and manhandled to jail for peacefully protesting injustice. Without independent news programs like Democracy Now and Alternet here in the US, all the protests against the war might as well have not occurred with our mainstream press blocking the news at every turn.

littlebitofsonshine said...

so true .Im glad someone was able to stand and servive the uncaring people bless that woman allways and may her life become the dream she forgot .

mullet said...

bastards!

gregrandgar said...

Gwoarrrr, Mullet, so cynical of late! Ugly bastards indeed. Beauty will out!